Firework Safety

Fourth of July is a fun and exciting holiday.  Children and their families look forward to BBQs, fireworks and other outdoor fun.  Although these activities bring joy, the risk of injury caused by burns is increased.  The following information includes tips to keep you and your family safe during the holiday. 

Fireworks can result in severe burns, most commonly injuring the face, neck, and hands.  If you want to enjoy fireworks, please keep the following tips in mind:
– Attend a fireworks display organized by professions.
– Supervise children around fireworks and remain a safe distance from them.
– Do not allow children to touch or play with fireworks including sparklers.  Even sparklers can reach temperatures over 1200 degrees.
– Never light fireworks indoors.  If you are using fireworks outdoors, soak all fireworks in water before disposing them in the garbage.

If a burn occurs, there are several steps that you can take to help your child:
1.  Soak the burn in cool water.  Avoid the use of ice as it can delay the healing process.  However, if the burn occurs in the eye, do not run water over it.  Instead, cut out the bottom of a paper cup, place it on the eye, and seek medical attention immediately.
2.  Remove clothing that is around the burn.   However, do not remove clothing that is stuck to the burn. 
3.  Cover the burn lightly with sterile gauze or a clean sheet or towel.

The following burns should be immediately treated by a medical provider:
– Burns that are more severe than a superficial injury.  For example, burns that result in swelling or blistering should be evaluated and treated by a medical provider.
– Redness and pain that lasts more than a few hours.
– Burns involving the hands, face (especially around the eyes and mouth), or genitals.

If you have any questions or concerns, please call our office.  Above all, have a safe and fun holiday!

Deborah Spiro, PNP, AE-C

Copyright © 2017 Oregon Pediatrics | Contact Us | Disclaimer | Site Map
Staff Schedules
Site by Web Design Portland :: CIWD